Thursday, February 21, 2019

Jackpot 100-mile Road Nationals 2019: bet big, run fast!

Jackpot is quite an ultra running festival! Happening in Henderson, Nevada, in the suburb of Las Vegas, aka Sin City, it has events covering the whole running sport: a few timed events (48-hour, 24-hour, 6-hour) a few ultras (100-mile, 50-mile), a marathon and even a 5K! The event is put by Ken and Stephanie who are passionate about celebrating life by giving back to the running community, which they do with such a generous heart. Offering a challenge to everyone, the tag line on the event tee is "Bet Big, Run Long!" Since I was running the a fixed-distance event, the 100-mile Nationals, I twisted the line toward speed.

I attended last year's edition with big hopes but a disappointing night when I got tired and too cold. This year was promising: first, there was a Nationals-only race with a brand new course, a simpler loop avoiding an out and back but most importantly, a short rocky trail section which became tricky to negotiate at night (ask Mike Bialik who fell last year when he was still leading the race). Second, the weather looked very cooperating. And, no, that's not my crew here! ;-)
This year I was racing in the memory of the boys' American Grandma, Ann, who passed away on Tuesday night. With all our family remaining in France, she was our surrogate local family and we celebrated many occasions together. A Math teacher, and single, she had retired early when health was an issue and was so thrilled to have lived for 3 more years after being diagnosed with lung cancer at 70. Her smile and positivity helped me throughout the day this Saturday! Ann was also a frequent reader of my blog, especially the "Running in..." post category which made her visit remote places virtually when her health didn't allow to do so in person.

And now on to that race report...

1. THE PLOT

Some context for the event. First, I could have had been in snowy Auburn instead as we had FOURmidable as the 3rd event of our Pacific Association Mountain Ultra Trail Grand Prix this year. After 2017, FOURmidable was back to hosting the 50K Trail Nationals with a super deep elite field both on the Men and Women side. But I had some unfinished business at Jackpot; besides, with my nagging gluteus injury since November, I'm certainly not prepared to battle on hilly and muddy trails right now. Although, with Boston mid April, I'm not sure when will be a good time to train for my trail races of May (Miwok 100K, Quicksilver 100K, Ohlone 50K). I keep saying that I use my many races as training runs, this will have to do...

After last year's second place to ultra star Jon Olsen, was I going for the money as he wasn't registered in the 100-mile race this year? Oh, no, I estimated that there were 6 faster guys who could win this championship. And I actually saw this as an opportunity for me to focus on the M50-54 American Record which Brian Teason set in 2013 at 15:02:30. I've so much respect for Brian, not just his running accomplishments but his philosophy and wisdom about life and human relationships, it has nothing against him of course. As a matter of fact, Brian was rooting for me as he says, last year already, and this year again. Among other feats, Brian was on Team USA 100K for the World Championships in 1999 in France and 1998 when the team took 4th in Japan. That being said, having run a 14:55 100-mile in 2012 (my 200th race: http://fartherfaster.blogspot.com/2012/11/run-damore-not-farther-but-much-faster.html), I still thought I had learned/gained more ultra skills and had enough in my legs to break 15 hours again. With 2 weeks remaining in this M50-54 age group, it was my last shot!

Leading to the race I had some good forced tapering as I was attending and speaking at our annual IBM THINK conference in San Francisco. Well, tapering from a running standpoint, but with all the commuting, leaving home at 6:30 and returning at 10 pm, I also trained with some sleep deprivation, which isn't typically the best race preparation. Yet, before that, I had my first 100-mile training week, with 2 50K, one in Paris 2 weeks ago and 1 at the track at home last week, after weeks of inactivity because of the injury and extensive travel (since the beginning of the year I flew to Costa Mesa, New Orleans, Madrid, Paris, and I'm flying to Singapore for 10 days, including a detour by Kuala Lumpur for 3 days!).

This time I didn't drive like last year, but flew on Friday afternoon, completing my checking in by 6:30 and walking our new 1.177-mile, counter clock wise to take pictures of the 48-hour runners who had been running for 11 hours. The flight was great, I even got a last minute upgrade for a change. We left SFO just after the rain (you can still the San Francisco skyline in the background), flew over many mountains covered with snow and reached Vegas ahead of schedule.


 Proud of this Vegas neighborhood for not watering their golf in the midst of such a persisting
If you want to see the danger of running 48-hour is about, see this (sorry, couldn't resist, upmost respect for these warriors for their persistence, and humor!).
And you see strange animals in the middle of the night (in addition to real rabbits!):
Or ghosts/zombies walking their dog...
Just kidding, having fun and making social connections will get you a very long way, it's actually recipe for success!!


I checked in at the hotel around 8 and, a first, cooked some beef in the microwave (2 minutes), and was very pleased with the result: some super tender and juicy meat. Although I've been on keto for 15 months now, I still leverage Peter Defty's advice of sneaking carbs and had some pasta with lots of Parmesan and heavy cream.

I was in bed by 10 pm, not after covering the window and air conditioning unit with pillows and blankets to try getting rid of the noise of the wind storm outside. Poor 48-hour runners who had to cope with that, not to mention the cold, all night.

2. THE RACE

I woke up before 5 am to finish my breakfast 3 hours before the race was set to start at 8. Arrived at the parking lot at 7:15, right on time to take my first Vespa. With 35 participants in the Championship, it wasn't too hard to find a good spot to leave my stuff on the course, next to the chip timing tent. I listened to Ken's long and detailed briefing from afar (he had 19 items to cover!) and we were set to start at 8, although we actually went off at 8:05.

I'll break the race down in 4 sections. Funny how it basically comes down to running about 4 marathons back to back...

2.1 20 MILES WITH SCOTT

The highlight of the day were the first 20 miles which I ended up running with Scott Jaime. From Colorado, Scott was part of the 6 favorites in my opinion, although he is more known for this trail racing. I typically don't talk in races, for the fear of losing my breath, given my exercise-induced asthma history, but we ended talking for almost 3 hours (!): all things ultra and trail running of course but also diet (he is fat-adapted too), training (incidentally, we had both ran 50K at the track the previous weekend, albeit on a track covered with snow for him), race nutrition, race goals (he was trying to improve his 17-hour PR), Vespa, electrolytes, work, family, travels, soccer (his whole family background, from parents to his kids), and many anecdotes about our ultra running encounters on the course or friends (he knows Dave Mackey well for instance). Scott and I, waving to Howard Nippert, USATF Official.
All this helped me stabilizing the pace on 8:10 min/miles, which was already on the too fast side of the spectrum but much better than the below-8 which I recalled from last year when I was insolently running ahead of Jon Olsen in the first part of the race...

Scott and I chuckled with a mix of admiration and incredulity as we got lapped by 4 runners every 7 or so laps. That meant they were running faster than 7 min/mile which didn't seem sustainable. But, sincerely, I couldn't care less about ranking for that race, my only goal was on my own clock and race strategy to break 15 hours, which would require minimal walking (I hate walking and I'm pretty bad at it anyway) and sustainable pace.

It was a delight and inspiring to see Jon many times on the course as he was nailing his own 6-hour as a training run for a 24-hour race in 4 weeks where he'll have to run 155 or more miles to make Team USA again. Jon ended up with 47.5 easy (!) miles for the 6-hour. Jon exhibits such a relaxed and efficient running form!

2.2 CRUISING THROUGH 50 MILES

Around 20 laps if I recall, Scott stopped for something. I waited a bit but, like he did when I had stopped at the porta-potty a few laps earlier, decided to keep moving, certain that he will catch-up if he wanted. I have to say that I felt quite lost at this point, to the point of going slightly too fast again. Thankfully, there was this easy mental mark of 10 minutes per lap which served as a beacon to slow down or pick-up the pace depending on if I had stopped to refill my bottles for instance (which took much more time than those having a crew). I had put on a piece of paper the pace corresponding to 10 minutes per lap and 10:30, 11, respectively 8:30, 8:55 (record pace) and 9:21 (out of bound). But I didn't stop to look at the paper, I was only aiming at 10 or below, for as long as I could sustain it.

Not counting a few stops to either pee, refill my water or GU Brew bottles or grab a GU gel, I'm super happy to report that the first lap my running time was over 10 minutes was lap 35 (mile 41) and it was only a 4-second miss. Overall, my split table shows some slowing but I was still holding on pretty well, and reach the half way point (42.5 laps / 50 miles) right on the 7-hour mark. Aggressive for a 15-hour goal but taking advantage of the amazing weather we had in the morning (the temperature had raised in the 50F, from about 58F at the start, and last night gusty wind was gone). I was feeling great and was trying not to get overly excited as there was still 50 miles to go! At least, the 10-minute lap mark made the maths easy: 420 minutes for 42 laps!

I had taken a Vespa concentrate every 3 hours, and a GU at the bottom of the first, second, fourth and fifth hour (to give some time for the Vespa to do its magic). Hydration was on track too (with the warmer temperatures last year, I had over done it and suffered from quite some swelling).

Let's also mention that the weather had changed right before my half way point to dark clouds and what ended up being only 30 minutes of light sprinkle, which is what I predicted from scanning the sky (many had put their rain jacket on; I didn't, but put a second long-sleeve layer as the temperature had dropped too).

2.3 HOLDING ON THE PACE FOR 20 MORE LAPS

I didn't take a break at mile 50, I knew every minute would count at the end. While the pace chart clearly shows some slowing overall, I was able to maintain a pace well below 9 min/mile for most of the laps. The trouble started on lap 56 when, after hearing about one crew being confused about where their runner was, mileage wise, I decide to stop for the first time by the timing tent to check the screen. To my dismay, the system was missing two laps. To my own surprise, my first reaction was that I had actually enough time in the bank to run 2 extra laps but, then, I got quite annoyed about the discrepancy and asked the timers to check my splits carefully. Losing precious seconds, or rather minutes, I stopped again the next lap and I was still short of 2 laps. I stopped again the next lap and, good news, they had found one of the missing splits. On the next lap/stop I asked the the USATF Official/Envoy, Howard, to help the timers find the other split, which they finally did. All this turmoil affected a bit my mental but, again, I was surprised I stayed mostly positive (let me apologize to the timers here if that didn't appear so) and focused on maintaining a good pace and on my nutrition

The other bump was at 10.5 hours of running when one of my Garmin watches buzzed with a Low Battery message. It was frustrating because if was the newer watch, the Forerunner 230, which used to hold charge for at least 14 hours when it was new. While the much older 310XT one (6 or 7 years old) was holding on just fine (and would last more than 16 hours at the end!). I had prepared a battery charger in a running belt but it looked like there was a short circuit so I wasn't sure when it was charging and ended up walking half a lap to hold the plug and replug it every 15 seconds. That made for my worst lap at 17 minutes and 25 seconds, oops! I still had a good margin but that meant I would have to really avoid anymore walking at the end....


2.4 ALL UPHILL FROM HERE!

There is this expression in trail and mountain running, it's all downhill from here, when you've passed the last summit/hill. Well, in a flat race against the clock, the last miles typically look uphill especially if you started too fast.

There were only (!) 20 miles to go but it was now pitch dark and the wind picked up, albeit not as bad as Friday night thankfully, yet some significant gusts, enough to break my pace at least. The funny thing --figure of speech-- was the change of wind direction between laps, I still can't comprehend that weather phenomenon but the bottom line is that sometimes the wind on the other side of the loop actually helped us.

I was trying to notice that to boost my mental, which was still quite good overall, and even enhanced by the encouragement of a few spectators and crews, and, even more meaningful and precious, the very own Jon Olsen whom, I learned afterwards, came back to the event after caring about his friend Kevin who dropped half way and ended up at the hospital on fear of kidney failure (which they ruled out eventually and fortunately). A good opportunity to talk about Kevin and Jon's crew, Brian, whom I'm super grateful for allowing me to borrow a few of their remaining water bottles. Indeed, I didn't mention that earlier but, I got disgusted with the taste of the water of the aid station, so much that I was drinking less than I should have in the first part of the race. As I told Brian and Jon, that good mineral water made my day and surely part of the overall success. I know, small details still matter too much to me in ultra races, I need to get stronger and more resistant... I'm trying...

Now that the lap count corresponded to my 310XT counter, I really felt I had this. Sure, I was slowing down a bit again but I'm super proud to report that I only clocked 3 laps over 12 minutes (and yet, below 13) in the last 23 laps. I kept recalculating the margin I had with regard to the record and, with 5 laps to go, estimated that I could end up at 14:48-14:50. I didn't cramp but I didn't want to push more either, with the fear that I would bonk. But, sure enough, I found some mental wings for the last lap, enough to cross the finish line with a time of 14:47:43.8. While I had broken 15 hours at the distance, it was a while back (2012) and the timing system had failed so I was given 14:56 based on my GPS and people's clocks. So this new time definitely represent a lifetime PR, finally at 54, or rather 54.96 to be precise! ;-) After all, I did PR on my fetish 50K distance at 52 so it's never too late to... Run Farther Faster!

Ken was asleep (so much deserved for an event spanning more than 55 hours), I was welcomed by his assistant, Lee, who was super supportive and upbeat all night! Howard took this picture before I got to the warming tent as I was super happy in my mind but my body felt quite beaten up. It crossed my mind that maybe I should run an extra lap in case there was a timing issue, but I didn't follow through. (Photo credit: Howard Nippert)
Learning and discovering that I had finished 3rd overall within a more competitive field than last year was the big cherry on the big cake. The 2019 champion was Mark Hammond who crushed a 13:05 and whose fame includes finishing 3rd at Western States last year. In second place was Sam Skeels who ran 157 mile at the Desert Solstice Invitational 24-hour in December and currently holds the second spot on Team USA for the upcoming World Championships. (Photo credit: Howard Nippert)
In all fairness, the field was really small with 35 participants, there are definitely many more out there who can run 100 miles under 15 hours. Less in my age though, but the speedsters will eventually turn 50 at some point... ;-)

3. POST RACE

As I come back to my post and that section 3 days later on a 17-hour flight to Singapore, there are so many things which have happened since my race ended at 10:52 pm on Saturday evening... So many congratulation messages and nice notes on Facebook, the award ceremony, flying back to SFO, driving straight to our Pacific Association USATF 2018 award celebration, seeing Agnès who got back from a linguistic trip to Québec with her French classes late Sunday night, work on Monday (IBM doesn't celebrate President's Day), a massage by Doods on Monday, a 9-mile recovery run before driving back to SFO on Tuesday morning, a full 10-hour work day on the plane, ...

Physically, I've actually felt quite well. The toughest was to handle the carbs I ate after the race, short of better food at my disposal. And getting asleep 90 minutes after the race at the hotel (but it felt really good to at least get 6 hours before the award ceremony). Some soreness on Sunday but I would have run on Monday if it wasn't for work and the packing again for 10 more days abroad. My 9-mile run on Tuesday started slowly (with some remaining tightness I was afraid that lengthening my stride could break something...) but I got in the groove on a crisp morning (34F at 6 am, clear sky, wonderful views of the snow at the top of Mount Hamilton, and inspiring sunrise), and averaged 7:32 min/mile at the end. Even the gluteus seems to have relaxed after this sustained 8:30 min/mile pace, that's very encouraging.

The outcomes from the field were uneven. Connie Gardner won her 11 overall National title while also breaking her F55-59 age group record.
Ultrarunning Hall of Famer Roy Pirrung won his M70-74 age group for his 89th National title (that's many USATF Champion patches!!).
In the next age group, Ed Rousseau who is turning 80 in a few months wasn't as lucky and struggled with back pain, missing 12 laps at the end.
In our Championship race, 20 finished, 15 dropped, 2 did not start.

Another example of inspiration and respect you get at such event is this policeman who exhibited a lot of resilience running in his combat uniform for more than 24 hours, in memory of a colleague who got shot while responding to a call in Texas a few weeks ago.



4. FEEDBACK

Since Ken teased me at the award ceremony for my feedback of last year, about the porta-potties apparently, I'm sure he expects no less than some feedback again this year! ;-)

Course. First and foremost, what a change this new course brought. So much faster, so much easier to manage mentally (at least for those used to run hundreds of laps at the track! ;-), so much safer (to avoid a fall like Mike Bialik's last year). A keeper. I was a bit doubtful about the math challenge of handling a 1.177-mile distance but the 10 minutes/lap worked very well for me (and you can adjust to your own target pace). A nice way to decompose the 100-mile distance.
Date. At the award ceremony, Ken mentioned the possibility of moving the championship race to Friday in order to minimize congestion as there are many runners on the course during the first 6 hours (6-hour, 24-hour, 12-hour, 100-mile, 50-mile, marathon). This I'm not sure, I think a weekday isn't going to boost participation but could actually arm it further, for those whose running is only (!) the second job as I call it for me. Personally, I found the flow smooth even through the first morning. Besides, it's also an opportunity to give and get so much uplifting encouragement to each others while passing or crossing.

Spirit. It was my second year and I saw the same amazing generosity from Ken and Stephanie who put so much into this, including prize money from their own business pocket. Indeed, you could think that the prize purse comes from USATF but it doesn't, it's only a requirement set by USATF that RDs allocate money to it (in addition to the fees they actually have to pay to sanction the event and certify the course). Generosity of time given to make such a unique running festival. And generosity of encouragement to all participants, bringing elite runners along with beginners and runners with a wide range of running experience and capability. Pure bliss!

Volunteers. Think of what it takes to get an aid station manned for more than 48 hours. In all sorts of weather conditions. I didn't stop much at the aid station, but grateful to these volunteers for being up all day and all night(s) for us!
Tents. Kudos for keeping the tents in place despite the wind, I've seen catastrophes before and that's dangerous... Here is Ken diligently adding ballasts to the tents on Friday evening before the gusty wind of that night:
Water. Well, that was my only issue, I found it so tasty, in a bad way. I know, that was the tap water at the Park so what can you do. This actually happened to me before so I was mad at myself for not having bought a few bottles when I stopped at Trader Joe's on Friday evening. Glad I found a crew with extra bottled water, that saved my day, and race!

Porta-potty. I feel Ken will be disappointed if I don't talk about that topic... ;-) So, indeed, super convenient to have 2 porta-potties on the shorter loop course. But, gee, how much these got used by everybody! I haven't checked the other 2 near the grass area since we weren't passing by, and excuse the language, that was definitely piling up after 2 days! Glad I only had to use them to pee... So, overall, good placement but, if all runners ended up using the two after the aid station, then put the four there, that will help with the flow (in one instance I had a crew blocking/reserving one porta-potty for a runner still in the course, dang).

Overall, super positive feedback, hope everyone had a great experience, apart from the gusty winds for the valorous 48-hour runners. Highly recommended event, there is something of everybody at this ultra festival, hope to see you all again next year!




Splits 
Time
Cumulative Time
Moving Time
Distance
Elev Gain
Elev Loss
Avg Pace
Avg Moving Pace
Best Pace
Calories
1
08:55.3
08:55.3
8:55
1.19
46
30
7:30
7:29
6:54
121
2
9:23
18:18
9:20
1.19
52
65
7:54
7:51
7:24
123
3
09:29.0
27:47:00
9:28
1.18
46
33
8:03
8:02
7:30
121
4
09:26.0
37:13:00
9:25
1.19
52
63
7:55
7:55
7:27
123
5
9:39
46:52:00
9:38
1.19
46
35
8:07
8:06
7:17
122
6
9:43
56:35:00
9:43
1.19
49
46
8:10
8:10
7:35
122
7
9:47
1:06:22
9:42
1.19
47
47
8:12
8:08
7:42
122
8
09:44.0
1:16:06
9:42
1.19
48
48
8:10
8:08
7:29
122
9
09:51.0
1:25:57
9:48
1.19
50
48
8:16
8:14
7:28
122
10
9:52
1:35:49
9:48
1.19
48
50
8:18
8:14
7:34
121
11
9:52
1:45:41
9:47
1.19
53
66
8:18
8:14
7:46
121
12
9:56
1:55:37
9:50
1.19
47
36
8:21
8:16
7:23
121
13
9:45
2:05:22
9:40
1.19
49
45
8:12
8:08
7:25
121
14
9:41
2:15:03
9:37
1.19
51
67
8:10
8:06
7:26
121
15
9:44
2:24:47
9:40
1.19
54
52
8:12
8:09
6:35
121
16
9:50
2:34:37
9:45
1.19
47
36
8:17
8:13
7:39
121
17
10:35
2:45:12
9:57
1.21
50
46
8:45
8:13
6:07
121
18
9:51
2:55:03
9:50
1.19
44
27
8:17
8:16
7:49
121
19
9:44
3:04:47
9:40
1.19
46
46
8:10
8:07
7:31
122
20
9:54
3:14:41
9:47
1.19
49
62
8:17
8:12
7:04
121
21
09:32.3
3:24:14
9:30
1.19
47
33
8:02
8:00
7:18
121
22
9:53
3:34:07
9:48
1.2
48
61
8:15
8:10
7:03
121
23
9:34
3:43:41
9:29
1.19
46
34
8:04
8:00
6:48
120
24
9:39
3:53:20
9:36
1.19
47
48
8:05
8:03
7:11
121
25
9:28
4:02:48
9:26
1.2
46
47
7:55
7:53
7:07
123
26
9:44
4:12:32
9:38
1.19
49
45
8:09
8:04
7:10
121
27
9:44
4:22:16
9:41
1.19
47
50
8:09
8:07
7:08
121
28
10:13
4:32:29
9:56
1.19
45
47
8:34
8:20
6:58
122
29
9:47
4:42:16
9:42
1.18
49
65
8:17
8:12
7:02
120
30
11:12
4:53:28
9:37
1.2
50
30
9:18
7:59
6:47
121
31
09:22.0
5:02:50
9:21
1.19
51
65
7:53
7:52
7:14
122
32
09:41.0
5:12:31
9:34
1.18
46
35
8:10
8:04
7:26
121
33
9:52
5:22:23
9:51
1.19
48
46
8:19
8:18
7:31
120
34
9:47
5:32:10
9:41
1.19
52
66
8:15
8:10
7:27
121
35
10:11
5:42:21
10:04
1.18
46
35
8:36
8:30
7:16
119
36
10:24
5:52:45
10:08
1.19
50
61
8:43
8:30
7:13
120
37
9:46
6:02:31
9:40
1.19
47
35
8:14
8:09
7:15
122
38
10:43
6:13:14
10:29
1.2
46
46
8:58
8:46
7:06
119
39
11:29
6:24:43
11:22
1.19
51
61
9:37
9:31
7:12
119
40
9:35
6:34:18
9:30
1.18
46
36
8:06
8:02
7:03
121
41
9:41
6:43:59
9:39
1.19
51
47
8:07
8:06
7:29
122
42
9:34
6:53:33
9:32
1.19
47
46
8:01
7:59
7:08
122
43
9:45
7:03:18
9:43
1.18
50
30
8:14
8:12
7:25
121
44
10:18
7:13:36
10:08
1.19
48
50
8:39
8:30
7:08
122
45
9:34
7:23:10
9:32
1.19
51
48
8:03
8:01
6:52
122
46
9:38
7:32:48
9:35
1.19
46
29
8:08
8:05
6:44
121
47
10:34
7:43:22
10:31
1.19
49
45
8:54
8:52
7:09
117
48
9:51
7:53:13
9:49
1.19
50
66
8:17
8:16
6:59
121
49
9:49
8:03:02
9:49
1.18
49
33
8:18
8:18
7:07
121
50
10:06
8:13:08
10:02
1.19
47
64
8:30
8:26
7:32
120
51
09:59.0
8:23:07
9:54
1.18
48
34
8:29
8:25
7:29
120
52
10:14
8:33:21
10:10
1.18
50
46
8:39
8:36
7:37
119
53
10:03
8:43:24
10:00
1.17
46
66
8:34
8:32
7:42
120
54
11:12
8:54:36
11:01
1.19
52
49
9:24
9:15
6:50
118
55
9:59
9:04:35
9:57
1.18
47
33
8:29
8:27
7:24
120
56
12:51
9:17:26
11:08
1.19
47
61
10:46
9:20
7:25
118
57
10:27
9:27:53
10:20
1.19
47
33
8:45
8:39
6:59
119
58
10:26
9:38:19
10:13
1.18
50
61
8:49
8:38
7:09
119
59
10:28
9:48:47
10:22
1.19
47
36
8:48
8:43
7:46
120
60
11:45
10:00:32
11:14
1.19
49
64
9:52
9:26
7:27
119
61
17:25
10:17:57
15:43
1.2
46
30
14:28
13:03
8:02
115
62
11:45
10:29:42
11:25
1.19
50
63
9:50
9:34
7:23
118
63
11:20
10:41:02
10:51
1.19
49
34
9:29
9:05
7:28
117
64
10:38
10:51:40
10:21
1.2
46
49
8:53
8:39
6:36
119
65
9:56
11:01:36
9:54
1.19
47
47
8:19
8:18
7:16
122
66
10:13
11:11:49
10:12
1.19
47
46
8:34
8:34
7:18
122
67
11:27
11:23:16
11:00
1.2
45
44
9:31
9:09
7:08
119
68
10:16
11:33:32
10:16
1.19
50
64
8:37
8:37
7:34
121
69
10:21
11:43:53
10:17
1.19
46
35
8:43
8:40
7:30
121
70
10:19
11:54:12
10:16
1.19
49
46
8:38
8:36
7:15
122
71
10:36
12:04:48
10:29
1.19
46
49
8:56
8:50
7:22
121
72
12:26
12:17:14
11:59
1.19
46
46
10:27
10:04
7:50
116
73
10:48
12:28:02
10:48
1.18
47
46
9:08
9:08
7:27
121
74
11:03
12:39:04
11:01
1.18
46
46
9:19
9:18
7:39
120
75
10:51
12:49:55
10:49
1.18
47
47
9:10
9:08
8:01
121
76
12:55
13:02:50
12:22
1.2
47
47
10:44
10:16
7:52
117
77
10:54
13:13:44
10:51
1.19
46
47
9:09
9:06
8:13
121
78
11:33
13:25:17
11:26
1.19
48
46
9:43
9:37
8:13
118
79
11:11
13:36:28
11:08
1.18
49
63
9:27
9:24
8:12
121
80
12:24
13:48:52
11:45
1.19
47
34
10:24
9:51
7:38
118
81
11:42
14:00:34
11:35
1.2
46
48
9:47
9:41
8:15
121
82
11:38
14:12:12
11:31
1.19
47
46
9:49
9:43
7:32
122
83
11:57
14:24:09
11:54
1.19
50
64
10:02
9:59
8:34
122
84
11:55
14:36:04
11:55
1.2
48
33
9:58
9:58
8:35
123
85
11:21
14:47:25
11:09
1.19
46
28
9:32
9:21
8:03
121
86
00:20.2
14:47:46
0:17
0.03
--
--
11:57
10:03
8:53
3
Summary
14:47:46
14:47:46
14:32:58
101.17
4,086
4,069
8:46
8:38
6:07
10,248



1 comment:

Scott Jaime said...

Really great recap Jean! I'm happy to have shared some miles with you. I too do not like to talk (that much) during races, however, I found our conversation easy and interesting. Thank you for the time we shared! More importantly, congrats on a fantastic race! You nailed it for sure. I'm sure our paths will cross again and looking forward to it.

All the best!
Scott Jaime